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ICE DIVER

If the spirit of adventure and unusual, challenging diving appeals to you, try diving under the ice.

Ice diving is one of the most adventurous scuba specialties because you confront conditions and see beauty few others ever experience.

Flash your PADI Ice Diver certification card to get instant respect, and usually a lot of curious questions from other divers about what it’s like under the ice.

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ICE DIVER

If the spirit of adventure and unusual, challenging diving appeals to you, try diving under the ice.

Ice diving is one of the most adventurous scuba specialties because you confront conditions and see beauty few others ever experience.

Flash your PADI Ice Diver certification card to get instant respect, and usually a lot of curious questions from other divers about what it’s like under the ice.

DOWNLOAD FULL DETAILS
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The Fun Part

Explore the unique aquascape found only under ice. Imagine being one of the very elite divers that dive under a solid ceiling of ice. You might get a chance to play with your exhaled air bubbles on the bottom of the ice or an opportunity to try the unique sport of upside down, bottom of the ice, skiing. Let your imagination take you places to the far corners of the world, or merely enjoy year round diving in your hometown lakes.

What You Learn

You will complete a minimum of three ice dives for your certification. Dives are typically done as a group working with support personnel, divers, tenders, and safety divers. Ice Diving is very much a team effort.You are under the ice to learn to control buoyancy, navigate under the ice, and keep in contact with the lead diver and tenders via line pulls for communication. You will learn:

  • Teamwork is essential for ice diving, so you’ll start by learning the roles and responsibilities of support personnel, tenders and safety divers
  • To plan and organize ice dives
  • Reasons and opportunities for ice diving,
  • Equipment considerations and benefits
  • About site selection, preparation and hole-cutting procedures
  • How to practice the procedures and techniques for handling the problems and hazards of ice diving
  • To use specialized ice diving equipment, safety lines, signals, communications, line tending and line-securing techniques
  • How to manage equipment problems
  • About the effects of cold, emergency procedures and safety-diver procedures
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Equipment

Besides your basic scuba equipment, you’ll definitely want to dive in a dry suit. Your PADI Instructor or team member at FLAOT N’ FLAG will suggest other gear appropriate for ice diving, such as a collapsible snorkel that fits in your pocket, redundant air supply such as a pony bottle, and other technical diving equipment.

Learning Materials

Your Ice Diving Crew Pack will include all the essential training manuals for this course.

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Learning Materials

Your Ice Diving Crew Pack will include all the essential training manuals for this course.

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prerequisites

You need to be a PADI Advanced Open Water Diver who is at least 18 years old to enroll in the Ice Diver course.

YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE

Although some ice divers dive in a wetsuit, you’ll probably find that you are more comfortable in a dry suit. The PADI Dry Suit Diver course can help you become familiar with the nuances of using a dry suit.

While you’re brushing up on your specialty diving skills, you should also take the Rescue Diver course, which puts you just one step closer to the Master Scuba Diver rating.

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YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE

Although some ice divers dive in a wetsuit, you’ll probably find that you are more comfortable in a dry suit. The PADI Dry Suit Diver course can help you become familiar with the nuances of using a dry suit.

While you’re brushing up on your specialty diving skills, you should also take the Rescue Diver course, which puts you just one step closer to the Master Scuba Diver rating.

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